The World from Laura’s Point of View

Superheadz Wide & Slim w/ Protopan 400

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My three and a half year old daughter Laura loves to take photos, I recently got her a Superheadz wide & slim - pink dress and here are some photos of her first film with this camera. The film is a Protopan 400 developed with uncle mort’s homebrew neg soup.

I’ve included a photo of Laura also (last image shot on a Nikon F60 + Fuji Neopan)

—Filipe Bonito

Laura is such a precious little girl!! Let’s hope she stays addicted to film for many many years to come!  Click here to find out how you too can share your photos and story with CGSF!!

Develop your own color film!

Lomo Xpro Chrome 100 on Diana Miniimage

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Fuji CN 200 (Müller Foto) on Superheadz Ultra Wide Slim

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Kodak Elitechrome 100 on Superheadz Ultra Wide Slim

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Tired of spending so much dough on color processing at the lab? Like the pictures you see above? Well, today Max Zulauf of http://maxattacks.tumblr.com has a special treat for you guys: DIY Processing of C-41 Films!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • a film-developer tank (a lot of people trust on Jobo Tanks, I got an AP because they are cheaper)
  • scissors
  • a trash bag 
  • the film you will want to process
  • measuring tools
  • a funnel
  • Tetanal C41 Rapid Kit (they come in liquid and powder form, for 1 or 5 litres of working solution. I guess the liquid is easier to work with but I don’t know since I’ve never used the powder)
  • chemistry bottles (I have plastic ones but I‘d rather go for 500ml glass bottles because they are heavier)
  • thermometer
  • an aquarium heater
  • a timer (I use my cell, every cell has a timer)
  • a water tank where you can fit the three bottles and the development tank
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Introduction:
Ok, first of all, you need to know that C41 is a normed process, this means that all films whatever ASA they are, take the same amount of time to develop. This helps if you want to process 2 films at one go and they have different speeds. There are different ways to process C41, the standard is on 38°C, but this is too hot for me and pretty fast, there is the 45°C express process and the 30°C slower process. I will show you the last method, because the temperature is easier to control and isn’t too fast.

Secondly, the chemicals will weaken pretty fast, this means the more film processed in this solution, the longer it’ll take to process subsequent films. But don‘t worry, each Tetenal pack has a manual in it with a nice chart and processing times.

Thirdly, try to avoid useless air contact with your chemicals. They will oxidize and turn bad faster if you leave bottles open and so on. You can slow the process down if you get yourself a Tetenal Protectan Spray, it adds a film of gas (heavier than air, lighter than water) on top of your chemicals without affecting its processing ability.

Mixing The Chemicals & Getting The Right Temperature:

Mix your chemicals. I use 500ml working solution, this means I can keep the 1 liter kit for twice as long. Mix them according to the manual in the package and pour each part (CD for Color Developer, BX for Bleach/Fix and Stab for Stabiliser) into one bottle, close it and label it accordingly. Put them into the water tank. Also put the thermometer and aquarium heater into it and fill the tank with warm water.

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It is crucial that you keep control over the water‘s temperature, because there is basically no tolerance in temperature for the process.This will now have to wait a little while, until it all is on 30°C. After a few go’s you’ll know how warm it has to be and you’ll be able to get almost the exact temperature needed. You can speed up this process by adding hot or cold water. On my part, I like to naturally heat up the water using a heater.

Load Film In The Developing Tank:

Take the scissors, film and tank, put them into the trash bag and the trash bag under your blanket. I only use the trash bag because I can trust that it’s dust-free. You do not need it but better be safe than sorry. As you know in this process, no light should get to the film. I won‘t explain the rest, since there are tons of tutorials on this out there. After you’ve loaded the film, put the tank into the waterbath as well.
(Alternatively you can just use a darkroom bag :) )

We’ll skip the part where you wait to get the right temperature. This can vary between minutes and an hour, depending on the initial water temperature.

Make sure that you have the manual with you so can be certain of the exact times need for each step.

Start developing!

First off, pour the CD into your tank. The time starts when you start pouring it.

Close the tank and put the funnel in the bottle. Put the tank back into the waterbath and just move it around there gently. You can rotate it a bit as well. Do this the entire time. This will first help you use all the chemicals, not only the parts next to your film, but it will also help the water in the tank to flow around and keep the same temperature. Because your heater is of no use if you only heat up the still water around the heater and the rest cools off. 

About 10 Seconds before the time runs out, pour the CD back into its bottle and store it for later use.
Then pour in the BX and just do the same thing like before. When you put the BX back into it‘s bottle, you‘ll need warm, running water.
Rinse the film for about 6 minutes. I normally proceed this way.

Fill the tank, invert it 10 times, pour out the water and repeat.
I normally do this 12 times, since it takes about 30 seconds each. After this it is already STAB time! No! No daggers, no knives. Sorry for that lame pun!

Put the tank on a steady surface and pour in the STAB. Just leave it like this for about a minute.
Since STAB foams so much, I never move it because it’ll exaggerate the foaming. After a minute pour in the STAB and rinse the film again.
Now it’s safe to open & check the tank.

Hold Your Breath & Open The Tank!

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I normally add a few drops of wetting agent, but this is up to you. The booklet in the Tetanal kit says nothing about a final rinse and most people will just hang the film to dry with the STAB foam still on it.

Now open up the reel, take off the film and hang to dry with a clothes peg. I normally hang two more at the bottom end to straighten the film.

Wash your tank & other equipments throughly as you do not want any calcium residues (due to hard water) on them, this can affect your results the next time round. If you want, you can blow-dry your negatives or just leave them there for about 2 hours. 

You can then cut the negs, put them in sleeves and press them for a few hours (for best results) but you can also just go ahead and scan them.

-maxattacks

Edit: DON’T FORGET TO SAY THANKS TO MAX! You can say hi to him by visiting his tumblr http://maxattacks.tumblr.com or visit his flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/bbbbjs.

Fujicolor Superia X-tra 400

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim

So what’s this myth I heard about not being able to use the UWS in the evenings-sunset? Of course you can, with 400ISO film! The pictures above proves this fact, but yeah, you have to be ready to get some spoiled shots as the amount of light and timing should be perfect. These were taken in March during the International Hot Air Balloon Festival in Putrajaya. We missed out on the super awesome Darth Vader balloon though..bah!

-delusiana

Kodak Professional T-Max 100

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim, 22mm, f11, 1/125

This B&W negative film is usually used to capture details in subjects for maximum print quality as all other film tagged with “Professional” do. As you can see above, images produced have high sharpness and very fine grain. However, you can also see that I used the roll to shoot space and lines instead, which I think worked out pretty well, as the contours and outlines of the clouds and the other subjects came out crisp and nice. I read somewhere that this film “sees” color the way our eyes do so now I am curious to see how filters will effect the contrast when compared to regular B&W film. 

-eleanorrigby236

Agfa CT Precisa 100ISO

Last post of the day, taken on that Tanjung Karang trip last month. (Or was it in January? Man, I’m getting old…)

I must say that I like these the best out of all the shots taken on this Agfa CT Precisa roll. Well, 3 rolls of Kodak Portra just arrived so I’m looking forward to experimenting with those on my Holga 120GCFN, hopefully they’ll turn out every bit as swell as eleanorrigby236’s :)

-delusiana

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim, 22mm Wide Angle Lens, f11, 1/125


Agfa CT Precisa 100ISO

Some scans from a Chinese temple in Klang. More detailed shots of this beautiful place will be uploaded soon once my Tri-X 400 roll on a Canon AE-1 is developed. Alas, most of my colored shots of the interior of this huge temple were also in that destroyed Superia Xtra 400 roll I told you earlier. *cries*

-delusiana

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim, 22mm Wide Angle Lens, f11, 1/125



Agfa CT Precisa 100ISO

Well, I managed to develop some shots from the Batu Caves photowalk last weekend and they turn out OK I guess. But alas, a whole roll of Fuji Superia Xtra 400ISO was completely spoiled as I didn’t set the ISO properly on the LC-A!! (the ASA dial was set between 400 & 200 so the pics weren’t exposed…gah)

I was quite depressed for a whole day when I got back from the lab T_T

Anyway I noticed my mistake when I changed the film to an expired Sensia 100ISO halfway up the climb so I hope that particular roll will be okay. *fingers crossed*

More info on Batu Caves here.

p/s: I’ll be making a separate entry of shots on this same CT Precisa roll taken during our last trip to Tanjung Karang & a Chinese temple in Klang later. I hope you guys wouldn’t be too bored with the triple posts, heh.

-delusiana

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim, 22mm Wide Angle Lens, f11, 1/125


Lomography Redscale Negative 100ISO

I thought of posting these shots just to demonstrate how awesome the Ultra Wide & Slim camera is. It’s cheap but packs a hell of a punch! Plus all photos were taken in a moving car on a highway but they’re still so sharp! This little plastic thing is beyond awesome, really. If you haven’t own it yet, please get one now, by all means necessary.

-delusiana

Superheadz Ultra Wide Slim,  f8, 32mm Wide Angle Lens

Kodak Gold 200

We always love receiving your photos. Remember that it doesn’t have to be a professional shot or a perfectly exposed photo (although we love those too!), we’re all about encouraging everyone to pick up a film camera and shoot!! Since we started this blog we have managed to pull a bunch of our friends who would have never considered shooting on film into the craze and we’re not stoping here. If you want to share your photos with other film enthusiasts send them to us and see them published on CGSF.

Now, on to our lovely contribution from Faizlyana who is also on Tumblr. The Kodak Gold 200 film is known for its grain but Faizlyana’s shots here are grain free even when shot on the Superheadz UWS which works best with ISO 400 film due to its fixed aperture and shutter speed of f/11 and 1/125 respectively. I just bought a roll of Fuji Superia 200 which is comparable to the Kodak Gold and will post some shots for comparison soon.

-eleanorrigby236

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim, f8, 22mm Wide Angle Lens


Lomography Redscale Negative 100ISO

I love my little plastic camera, it’s so so so sharp!! And don’t get me started on the vignetting, it’s far better than Holga’s! (okay I’m being biased, I don’t have the Holga BC but this is by far a cheaper option.)

The first 3 shots had been exposed multiple times. How did I achieve that you ask, seeing that the Wide & Slim doesn’t have that MX button? Well, my film advance dial got stuck halfway (partly my fault as I didn’t slot the film sprockets properly while loading the film) so what I did was I rewound the film all the way back and shot them all over again. Lucky me the shots weren’t spoiled and I got these effects instead.

I love my little accidents :)

-delusiana

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim, f8, 22mm Wide Angle Lens

                    

Kodak Ektar 100ISO

Another set of shots from the Ektar roll. This was taken in Batu Pahat, Johore and fyi, those stone slabs were Muslim headstones (d’uh). All pics were taken at 12 noon but the graveyard was super shady. The trees overhead were huge…I can imagine how spooky this place must be at night *brr…*

One can just imagine a Pontianak (a type of vampire in the Malay lore, usually originating from a dead pregnant lady if I’m not mistaken…anyway google is your friend) staring at you from amongst the branches…gah!!

-delusiana

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim, f8, 22mm Wide Angle Lens


This one’s definitely not a graveyard scene, lol

Kodak Ektar 100ISO

Remember my gripe against the Kodak Ektar, saying how the colors turn out muted, greenish and not so sharp? Well, somehow they are sharper when the sun is behind you or by shooting under a shade thus shielding your view against direct sunlight rather than in front of you/directly behind the object; which is unlike the Velvia which you can see here.

See the pictures below for comparison. All pics were taken with the sun behind me/obliquely against the object except the first and the one with the obvious glare.

Somebody suggested that if the film is sent to a Kodak Lab rather than a Fuji Lab (which is what we have been doing), the colours would turn out nicer and less greenish. We’ll give that a try next time.

-delusiana

Superheadz Ultra Wide Slim, f8, 22mm Wide Angle Lens

* Malacca


I will be posting more shots of this film later (also on the same roll but at a different place, taken under a sunny 16 condition.)

Agfa CT Precisa 100ISO

Yay, another series of “firsts” for the day. Here we’ve got prints from the super cute Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim. But they sure weren’t joking when they wrote on the box that you should only shoot in bright sunlight, heh. And for a tiny plastic thing, it sure is wide! As for the film, well, they weren’t kidding when they say that this is one of the best slide films to be cross-processed!

-delusiana

Superheadz Ultra Wide & Slim, f8, 22mm Wide Angle Lens